duas aves

actegratuit:

Japanese studio h220430 has created a chair that seems to be suspended in mid-air by ten helium balloons attached by strings to a floating seat. The balloon is constructed out of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) and a cord that are connected to the ceiling by hidden anchors giving the chair the illusion of weightlessness. The piece was ”inspired by feelings of floating that the main character felt in the French movie, Le Ballon Rouge (1956),”actegratuit:

Japanese studio h220430 has created a chair that seems to be suspended in mid-air by ten helium balloons attached by strings to a floating seat. The balloon is constructed out of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) and a cord that are connected to the ceiling by hidden anchors giving the chair the illusion of weightlessness. The piece was ”inspired by feelings of floating that the main character felt in the French movie, Le Ballon Rouge (1956),”actegratuit:

Japanese studio h220430 has created a chair that seems to be suspended in mid-air by ten helium balloons attached by strings to a floating seat. The balloon is constructed out of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) and a cord that are connected to the ceiling by hidden anchors giving the chair the illusion of weightlessness. The piece was ”inspired by feelings of floating that the main character felt in the French movie, Le Ballon Rouge (1956),”

actegratuit:

Japanese studio h220430 has created a chair that seems to be suspended in mid-air by ten helium balloons attached by strings to a floating seat. The balloon is constructed out of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) and a cord that are connected to the ceiling by hidden anchors giving the chair the illusion of weightlessness. The piece was ”inspired by feelings of floating that the main character felt in the French movie, Le Ballon Rouge (1956),”


atlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Vaatlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum
In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 
Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 
For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 
(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Va

atlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum

In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 

Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 

For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 

(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Va


livelymorgue:

June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times


theparisreview:

“I only write when I want to. I’m an amateur and insist on staying that way. A professional has a personal commitment to writing. Or a commitment to someone else to write. As for me… I insist on not being a professional. To keep my freedom.”
In Music & Literature’s latest issue, read an excerpt from the last interview with Clarice Lispector. From our archives, read the story “One Hundred Years of Forgiveness.” View Larger

theparisreview:

“I only write when I want to. I’m an amateur and insist on staying that way. A professional has a personal commitment to writing. Or a commitment to someone else to write. As for me… I insist on not being a professional. To keep my freedom.”

In Music & Literature’s latest issue, read an excerpt from the last interview with Clarice Lispector. From our archives, read the story “One Hundred Years of Forgiveness.”


yo-charlie:

dichotomization:

Depression era: when they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, the mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

Always and forever my favorite fashion history fact.

yo-charlie:

dichotomization:

Depression era: when they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, the mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

Always and forever my favorite fashion history fact.


I think interpretation is trying to liberate what one is unconscious about. When one can let go some things one doesnt know are there - the unexpected things and the surprises in the performance - that’s when its worthwhile. This is also what I appreciate in other performers. When they are masters of their means of expression, this does not exactly interest me. That interests me in a teacher, but in a performer I am interested in what happens behind or in spite of the things the performer consciously wants to do. Maybe I am a little bit of a voyeur, you know, that way. But this is what I love.

Martha Argerich (via lookdonttouchgirl94)